The top IRS criminal agent in Philadelphia, who has been the public face of the agency in many recent tax fraud cases, has been charged with sexually assaulting a coworker at an event in St. Louis last month.

Gregory Allen Floyd, 54, was charged with sexual abuse, a misdemeanor. According to the St. Louis police report, Floyd was at an outing with several other IRS employees in the city's downtown area on Sept. 28 when he became "increasingly sexually aggressive" toward the female agent.

As Floyd and the coworkers were leaving, Floyd grabbed the woman around the waist, pushed his hand between her legs and began groping her, the police report said.

A St. Louis Police Department mugshot of IRS supervisor Gregory Allen Floyd, who was arrested on charges of sexually assaulting a coworker.
St Louis police department
A St. Louis Police Department mugshot of IRS supervisor Gregory Allen Floyd, who was arrested on charges of sexually assaulting a coworker.

A source familiar with Floyd's case said he has been temporarily removed from his supervisory position.

"The IRS holds our employees to high standards, and we do not tolerate inappropriate behavior," an IRS spokesman said in a statement. "When questions arise, the IRS works closely with the appropriate law-enforcement agencies."

A woman who answered the phone at Floyd's home in Wilmington said Floyd was not there, but would be told of the call. Floyd did not call back.

Floyd grew up in the Cobbs Creek neighborhood of Philadelphia. He is a graduate of Overbrook High School and St. Joseph's University, where he majored in accounting.

He previously served in the IRS revenue division before transferring to criminal investigations in 1993.

As the agent in charge of the criminal investigations division, he regularly makes announcements in criminal cases involving his agents.

In August, when three lower-level Bucks County officials were charged with money laundering and related offenses, Floyd issued a statement that public officials must be held to high standards.

"The laws of the land apply to everyone, even public and banking officials," he said at the time. "The public places a great deal of trust in these officials, and that trust is broken when they commit crimes."