I hope you're not reading this while walking around on your phone. Advocates are organizing to make Philly's streets safer, but there are still plenty of neighborhoods where pedestrians and cyclists are often in danger — they're just not the neighborhoods you might expect. If you see a Sixers fan this morning, be extra nice. They're probably a little down after learning rookie Zhaire Smith is injured. The Process works in mysterious ways, it seems. Speaking of injured athletes, the quarterback lineup for the Eagles' preseason opener tomorrow is clearing up, and you may not like it.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

In recent months, human bike lanes lined with cycling advocates have sought to raise awareness of cyclist deaths and demand safer streets.

What do the protests have in common? The demonstrators are often overwhelmingly white, and their locations tend to focus on the city's wealthier, central neighborhoods.

But the Philly neighborhoods with the most dangerous roads are outside of Center City, and often in low-income communities.

Zhaire Smith, one of the Sixers' 2018 draft picks, is just like teammates Markelle Fultz, Ben Simmons, and Joel Embiid in at least one way. He's yet another rookie to suffer an injury shortly after joining the team.

News that Smith had been injured at a development camp in Las Vegas broke Tuesday and it was later confirmed he fractured his left foot and will need surgery.

What was that noise? Oh, just the collective, exasperated sigh of the Sixers' fandom.

Health care is often a pain to navigate, and for employees at Chestnut Hill Hospital, it may be getting worse. The hospital was acquired by Tower Health last fall and the company is proposing a new health care plan.

But the plan doesn't appear to have any "in-network" doctors in Philadelphia. The biggest in-network hospital with the most extensive services and in-network doctors is Reading Hospital, an hour away. The whole ordeal is a window into just some of the effects of the health care consolidation frenzy.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

Looks like a nice spot for a run, @nickjmalf.

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we'll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout out!

That’s Interesting

Opinions

Guns in Philly
Signe Wilkinson
Guns in Philly
"I now feel strongly that Craig has paid for his crime. He has served enough time and belongs with his family who has suffered while he has been incarcerated." Mitzi Birli Foulke, whose older brother was killed in 1982, on why
— she wants his killer released from prison.

What we’re reading

Lily Sage, 23, the daughter of Philly Goat Project director Karen Krivit mixes it up with the projects goats July 29, 2018. They are corralled in a mildly electrified fence so they can eat the weeds, before the fence is moved to another section of the grounds in need of clearing. Not only can goats eat plants other animals avoid, they actually prefer them - a single goat can eat eight pounds of weeds a day. The project offers goats for "yard work," as well as for education/awareness purposes, like goat therapy and goat yoga.
TOM GRALISH / Staff Photographer
Lily Sage, 23, the daughter of Philly Goat Project director Karen Krivit mixes it up with the projects goats July 29, 2018. They are corralled in a mildly electrified fence so they can eat the weeds, before the fence is moved to another section of the grounds in need of clearing. Not only can goats eat plants other animals avoid, they actually prefer them - a single goat can eat eight pounds of weeds a day. The project offers goats for "yard work," as well as for education/awareness purposes, like goat therapy and goat yoga.

Your Daily Dose of | Goats

Need your lawn trimmed or some peace of mind? A new North Philly nonprofit is training goats to be therapy animals and landscapers. The kids are all right.