Good morning, Philly. Today, Ronnie Polaneczky's moving four-part series on adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities comes to a close; it's a must-read, if I may say so. And the world is watching as the aftermath of President Trump's declaration on Jerusalem unfolds.

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— Aubrey Nagle

Pittsburgh Penguins’ Sidney Crosby (87) celebrates with the Stanley Cup Sunday, June 11, 2017.
AP Photo/Mark Humphrey
Pittsburgh Penguins’ Sidney Crosby (87) celebrates with the Stanley Cup Sunday, June 11, 2017.

Philadelphia and Pittsburgh couldn't be more different. Philly's bigger, louder, more historic — and then, of course, there's the fans. So why has Pittsburgh won more than twice as many major professional championships in the last 50 years?

Perhaps the city's identity clings to its championships and their fans are less likely to gripe about a struggling team. Or maybe it defies explanation.

As each city's NFL team eyes up the Super Bowl, reporter Frank Fitzpatrick investigates why the Steel City is the "City of Champions." (Philly fan trigger warning: there are infographics, and they will make you a little sad.)

Aging parents of adult children with intellectual and developmental disabilities must devise plans for their children's future, one where they're no longer around, well in advance. These difficult conversations are made more so by the sometimes limited care options available.

The final chapter of columnist Ronnie Polaneczky's series "Falling Off the Cliff" focuses on how parents ensure their loved ones will be cared for.

Yesterday, President Trump officially recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and vowed to move the U.S. Embassy there. Reactions to the declaration, which broke with 70 years of U.S. policy, have ranged from joy to outrage.

Leaders across the globe have condemned the move, which many fear will spark protests and violence and delay critical peace talks. Perhaps ironically, Trump's move undermines what son-in-law Jared Kushner has been trying to do for months: devise a new peace plan between Israelis and Palestinians.

The Hamas militant group called for a new armed uprising and Palestinians called for protests in wake of the announcement. As columnist Trudy Rubin writes, the move "seemed more oriented toward pleasing his evangelical base (and key Republican donor Sheldon Adelson) than achieving peace."

What you need to know today

We want to see what our community looks like through your eyes. Show us the park that your family walks through every weekend with the dog, the block party in your neighborhood or the historic stretch you see every morning on your commute to work.

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we'll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout out to build those followers!

That’s Interesting

Opinions

December 6, 2017
Signe Wilkinson
December 6, 2017
"In a criminal justice system in which the danger one poses is largely determined by race and class, Manafort is at the top of the food chain and Mill is at the bottom." — Author and radio host Solomon Jones examines how Paul Manafort and Meek Mill's brushes with the law have led to very different outcomes.

What we’re reading

Your Daily Dose of | Artful Thinking

Learning to see is fundamental to being an artist and a doctor. So Penn Medical students are studying art to become better observers.