Two very personal stories are our focus this morning. The first follows Ryan Straschnitzki, the hockey player whose life was changed forever by a deadly April bus crash. His recovery journey has taken him from Canada to Philadelphia. The second is that of Johnny Bobbitt, whose feel-good story of new beginnings has been torn asunder by battles over the money raised for him a battle that still isn't over. And, in case you forgot, (how could you?) tonight the Eagles start their drive for another world championship. Go Birds.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

Ryan Straschnitzki, 19, is held by Anne Leer, a recreational therapist at Shriners Hospitals for Children in Philadelphia as she eases him toward the chair that will raise him out of the therapy pool.
MICHAEL BRYANT
Ryan Straschnitzki, 19, is held by Anne Leer, a recreational therapist at Shriners Hospitals for Children in Philadelphia as she eases him toward the chair that will raise him out of the therapy pool.

On April 6, a bus carrying the Humboldt Bronco Canadian junior hockey team was traveling to a playoff game when it collided with a semi-trailer truck.

Sixteen people on the bus died. Ryan Straschnitzki, 19, miraculously survived but suffered a spinal cord injury that paralyzed him from the arms down.

His road to recovery brought him from Saskatchewan all the way to Philadelphia, where, thanks to Shriners Hospital for Children, he's defined his new normal.

The story of Johnny Bobbitt is a cautionary tale. Late last year the homeless man’s act of kindness inspired $400,000 in crowdfunding.

Now the couple who organized the GoFundMe campaign in his name is invoking the Fifth Amendment and no-showing court hearings over where all that money has gone.

Why the campaign for Bobbitt went viral when so many others don't is anybody's guess. But there are ways to donate to charity without being taken for a ride.

Limerick Township recently closed the sale of its municipal sewer system to a private operator, generating $75.1 million for the town. There’s a catch: Limerick’s 5,400 customers are facing an 84 percent bill increase in a few years.

But Limerick is not alone. Throughout Philly's suburbs, private operators and local governments are battling over who will own public water systems and who will foot the bill.

What you need to know today

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September 6, 2018
Signe Wilkinson
September 6, 2018
"This is where you come in, Philly. You have the chance to help improve odds for little kids with leukodystrophy – if not for Ruby and Tabriz, then at least because of them."
— Columnist Ronnie Polaneczky on one local mother’s life-and-death quest to bring a New Caledonia family all the way to a CHOP medical conference.

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The Small family poses for a portrait inside Marty Small’s fan cave in Atlantic City. Small bought new memorabilia, including a Super Bowl champions banner, following the Eagles win in February.
HEATHER KHALIFA / Staff Photographer
The Small family poses for a portrait inside Marty Small’s fan cave in Atlantic City. Small bought new memorabilia, including a Super Bowl champions banner, following the Eagles win in February.

Your Daily Dose of | Fandom

Thanks to years of passion and decoration, plus some newly minted Super Bowl memorabilia, Philly’s biggest Eagles fans are ready for kickoff in their incredible fan caves.