Hey, Philly. That was some storm, huh? Yes, I'm talking about the weather, not the flurry of primary election results that filled up your feeds last night. I've gathered the results and my colleagues' analysis on the results for you right here. In non-election-related news, a "Ride of Silence" will take place today to honor cyclists killed or injured by motorists. It's an especially touching tribute just days after another cyclist was killed and following calls for increased bike safety measures throughout the city. It's sure to be an emotional evening for riders.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

Mary Gay Scanlon, at her victory party in Swarthmore, won the Democratic nomination in Pennsylvania’s newly configured Fifth District.
CHARLES FOX / Staff Photographer
Mary Gay Scanlon, at her victory party in Swarthmore, won the Democratic nomination in Pennsylvania’s newly configured Fifth District.

It was a late night at some polling places in the Pennsylvania primary thanks to the storms. But it's a new day for the winning candidates who will soon switch gears to focus on the November general elections.

Tickets are set for governor and lieutenant's race: Republican state senator and trash hauling magnate Scott Wagner bested Paul Mango and Laura Ellsworth in the primary. He'll face Gov. Tom Wolf this fall  and they couldn't be more different. Lieutenant governor Mike Stack III lost his chance at reelection to Democrat Braddock Mayor John Fetterman in a hotly contested race. Fetterman will face Republican Jeff Bartos.

Trump loyalist Lou Barletta will face incumbent Democrat Bob Casey on the U.S. Senate ballot.

Incumbents hold on: Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick won the Republican primary for the U.S. House in the First District; he'll face Democrat Scott Wallace in the Bucks County swing district. U.S. Reps. Brendan Boyle and Dwight Evans won their primaries in the Second and Third Districts, respectively. Their future Republican challengers, David Torres and Brian Lieb, ran unopposed.

Women get closer to breaking Pa.'s all-male U.S. House delegation: State Rep. Madeleine Dean won the Democratic primary in the Fourth District and Mary Gay Scanlon did the same in the Fifth. They'll face unopposed Republican challengers Dan David and Pearl Kim, respectively.

What's it all mean? The results highlight both sides of the political divide under Trump. Democrats hope to take control of the U.S. House this fall and thus rallied behind suburban women. Pennsylvania Republicans doubled down on Trump-like candidates, signalling a shift away from appealing to moderate swing voters.

The death of Pablo Avendano, the courier who was killed Saturday night while delivering food for Caviar on his bike, has renewed calls for bike safety measures in Philly. But the tragedy is also raising questions about workers' rights in the gig economy.

Just days after his death, the "Ride of Silence," an annual ride to remember cyclists who have been killed or injured by motorists, takes place today. Friday is also nationwide Bike to Work Day.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

Wow. You win this round, @sepoulton.

Tag your Instagram posts or tweets with #OurPhilly and we'll pick our favorite each day to feature in this newsletter and give you a shout out!

That’s Interesting

Opinions

May 16, 2018
Signe Wilkinson
May 16, 2018
"The night he was killed, he was wearing a helmet. His tail light was lit. He was pedaling along a designated bike lane. He was the rule-following antithesis of those outlaw, rule-busting riders that the anti-bike crowd loathes."
— Columnist Ronnie Polaneczky on how protected bike lanes could have saved Pablo Avendano, a cyclist killed Saturday.

What we’re reading

Grant McKnight, founder and president of Dura Edge, inspects ground clay at the production facility near Slippery Rock.
JOHN BEALE / For the Inquirer
Grant McKnight, founder and president of Dura Edge, inspects ground clay at the production facility near Slippery Rock.

Your Daily Dose of | Dirt

Without one Slippery Rock, Pa. company, MLB players would be, well, slippery every time it rains. That's because they're the league's chief supplier of top-notch dirt.