There are less than three months until the midterm elections and local races are set to have a major impact on the national political landscape. So, today we're breaking down the most competitive races in our region for you to keep an eye on. Meanwhile, Princeton is making some important changes to campus life in an effort to be more welcoming to a diverse student body. The first step? Facing its very complex history head-on. Oh, and in case you haven't heard, the Eagles play tonight. Go Birds.

— Aubrey Nagle (@aubsn, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

Princeton, one of the nation's oldest elite universities, is embracing and revealing its complicated past in an effort to be more welcoming to its increasingly diverse student body.

It's made moves like naming an archway after a former slave who worked on campus and commissioning new portraits of distinguished alumni. But it's also had to grapple with the tainted legacy of one of Princeton's most iconic leaders: Woodrow Wilson.

Princeton isn't the only local school to struggle with its past. Bryn Mawr is reducing the visibility of its second president after reviewing her history of racism.

When the midterm elections arrive this November, the Philadelphia region will be a key national player. Democrats are looking to gain the House majority and they're targeting six local Republican-held districts. Both Pennsylvania and New Jersey host Senate races, too, as the GOP tries to keep its 51-49 advantage.

So, to break down the local landscape, my colleague Jonathan Tamari has ranked the most competitive contests in our region.

One opponent Pennsylvanians will face this November is an old foe: uncounted absentee ballots. Not all votes are counted because the deadlines are just too tight.

The region's top Justice Department official sharply criticized Philadelphia leaders for its "sanctuary city" policy Wednesday.

U.S. Attorney William M. McSwain blamed the policy for giving an undocumented Honduran man who raped a child a "free pass." The man had been released by police in 2015 after an aggravated assault case against him was dropped. He was arrested for raping a family member a year and a half later.

What you need to know today

Through Your Eyes | #OurPhilly

Ok, "jawning" is officially my new favorite word, @philly_jawnings.

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That’s Interesting

Opinions

August 9, 2018
Signe Wilkinson
August 9, 2018
"It did not take me long to realize that in the United States, unions are the pathway to middle class whether you're black, white, immigrant, native born, blue-collar or white-collar. " — Fatmata Massaquoi, a cabin cleaner at the Philadelphia International Airport and an active leader of her union, 32BJ SEIU, on how unions made her American dream possible.

What we’re reading

Lauren and Michael Norden, of Robbinsville, with their daughter, Emily, Saturday, July 28, 2018, on the beach off 5th Street, in North Wildwood. Later, a banner plane announced the gender of their expectant baby. Vernon Ogrodnek / For the Inquirer
Vernon Ogrodnek / For the Inquirer
Lauren and Michael Norden, of Robbinsville, with their daughter, Emily, Saturday, July 28, 2018, on the beach off 5th Street, in North Wildwood. Later, a banner plane announced the gender of their expectant baby. Vernon Ogrodnek / For the Inquirer

Your Daily Dose of | Surprise

Banner planes are a Jersey Shore staple. But one local family put a twist on tradition by hiring a flight to answer an important question: boy or girl?