Happy Friday, Philly and thank you for starting the day with us. President Trump's executive order to end the separation of families at the U.S. border has not silenced critics. Many are wondering if the children already separated from loved ones will ever see their parents again. The president asked NFL players for examples of people that were treated unfairly by the government for him to consider for pardons, but players like Malcolm Jenkins believe he's missing the point. Looking to de-stress a little bit? My colleague Grace Dickinson highlights one of the Philly region's most peaceful summer activities. Let's get to it.

— Ray Boyd (@RayBoydDigital, morningnewsletter@philly.com)

In this photo, provided by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, people who’ve been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas, on Sunday, June 17, 2018. More than 2,300 minors have been separated from their parents since April.
U.S. Customs and Border Protection's Rio Grande Valley Sector
In this photo, provided by U.S. Customs and Border Protection, people who’ve been taken into custody related to cases of illegal entry into the United States, sit in one of the cages at a facility in McAllen, Texas, on Sunday, June 17, 2018. More than 2,300 minors have been separated from their parents since April.

Children that were separated from their families as a result of the Trump administration's "zero-tolerance" policy are being held at agencies across the Philadelphia region. It's just not clear how many there are. City and state officials say the federal government has largely kept them in the dark.

What is also unclear is whether or not those children will ever be reunited with their parents. President Trump signed an executive order to end the separation of families at the border, but it does not directly address how the thousands of children will be reunited with their families.

According to reports, there is fear that poor coordination among federal agencies could lead to some of those children waiting months to see their parents again — if they do at all.

President Trump has not had the best relationship with NFL players, stemming from the decisions of some to protest police brutality and injustice during the national anthem. This month, the president asked players to provide him with a list of people they feel were "unfairly treated by the justice system," to be considered for pardons.

A group of players have responded to the request, including Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins and former Eagle Torrey Smith. They were joined by other players in an op-ed for the New York Times and made it clear that individual pardons aren't enough.

 "If President Trump thinks he can end these injustices if we deliver him a few names, he hasn't been listening to us," the players wrote. Jenkins previously planned to end his raised fist protest next season, but the NFL's new rule aimed at preventing such demonstrations has him reconsidering.

Of all the things to get yourself into this summer, the most peaceful might be kayaking and canoeing through the waters that fill our region. As reporter Grace Dickinson explains, you have plenty of options in and around Philadelphia.

Whether you're in it to discover serenity, or looking to get in a workout, this list will guide you through Philly's best waterways. Between splashing in Philly's public pools and hitting the shore, water enthusiasts have always had ways to indulge during the summer, but this might be an overlooked activity.

Festivals, museums and watching TV are all great summer plans, but if you're looking for a new thrill, maybe it's time to add canoeing and kayaking to the mix.

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June 22, 2018
Signe Wilkinson
June 22, 2018
"A producer from a local television station called to inquire if I would like to come on and defend the separation of parents and children at the border. I politely replied, 'No, thank you.' And then it dawned on me. This producer knew that Christine Flowers is a conservative." — Columnist Christine Flowers writes that people think they know what she believes simply because she's a conservative.

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Your Daily Dose of | Rock

Philly rock band Dr. Dog will play their biggest hometown show on Saturday night at Festival Pier, energized by their new album, Critical Equation.