When Jake Logar was a freshman, Shane Snyder would joke about how quiet Logar was.

"One thing we have in common is that we're both the youngest of three boys," said Snyder, head coach of the Washington Township boys' soccer team. "The youngest is supposed to be the loudest. I told him I expected him to be more of a chatter mouth. I'm the youngest of three boys and I never shut up."

Snyder still laughs about it now because it's a contrast to what he has seen from Logar this preseason.

And, really, it's amazing how quickly it all changed.

Last year, Logar was a junior captain on a Minutemen team that won the Coaches Tournament and a fourth straight South Jersey title.

Now he's a senior, leading with his voice and his play — a scrappy two-way midfielder — hungry to add another chapter to one of the best runs in South Jersey history.

“We try to be role models on the team, to show the younger players that they have to keep up the standard and push hard.” — Jake Logar on the team’s senior leaders

"When me and my brothers were younger, my dad was big on telling us to keep pushing, keep fighting, to always be team-first," said Logar, who generated six goals and three assists while earning first-team all-South Jersey honors for the 21-3-1 Minutemen. "That's what I tried to bring last year as a captain, and I think I grew into the role more and more as the season went on."

The biggest lessons Logar can impart to his team are the ones that run through his family.

The Logars are veritable royalty of South Jersey soccer.

Logan (right) battles for the ball with Shawnee’s Kane Feudtner in November 2017.
AVI STEINHARDT
Logan (right) battles for the ball with Shawnee’s Kane Feudtner in November 2017.

Jake Logar's father, Andy, was the NCAA Division III national player of the year in 1991 as a top scorer for Rowan University. He was a standout on a team that won a national title in '90. His two uncles, Chris and Dave, were stars at Lenape and then Rowan.

Jake's brothers Tyler, who graduated 2014, and Ryan, who graduated in 2016, were both captains at Washington Township and both carried on the family legacy at Rowan.

The Logars' run at Washington Township has coincided with one of the best stretches by any boys' soccer program in South Jersey history — two state titles, five South Jersey titles, three Coaches Tournament titles.

"I've been blessed over the past nine years to have kids in the program that have been raised the right way and play soccer the right way," Snyder said. "My best players have, for the most part, been my most coachable kids. When we're critical, they take it the right way. They set an example. And [the Logars] give you that. They're awesome."

Jake was a freshman when his brother, Ryan, scored the winning goal in the Group 4 state title game, the Minutemen's second straight state championship. The goal is lore not just because of the stage but because Ryan was playing with one good leg after badly spraining his ankle in the semifinals, another game in which he netted the winner. At that point, Ryan was on crutches everywhere except the soccer field.

"It makes you want to push even harder. Growing up watching my brothers play — we all just focus on giving our all to the team, just helping as much as we can. It kills us to not be on the field," Logar said. "We all love the game.

"It's just a huge part of our family."

Logar enters his senior season as a key member of one of the strongest cores in South Jersey. Logar and fellow seniors Chad Yates, Brett Guetens and Arturo Serano were all-conference players last year.

Aside from being talented, they're all friends, have all been playing on the same club team for years and grew up absorbing the players and the culture that has brought Washington Township such sustained success.

Logar reacts after time expired in Washington’s Township’s 1-0 loss to Princeton in the 2017 Group 4 state semifinal game.
TIM TAI / Staff Photographer
Logar reacts after time expired in Washington’s Township’s 1-0 loss to Princeton in the 2017 Group 4 state semifinal game.

"Most of the seniors have been friends for almost 10 years," said Logar who also stressed that he's still weighing his options on where he's going to play in college. "We try to be role models on the team, to show the younger players that they have to keep up the standard and push hard."

An appreciation of that history — his family's and his team's — only adds to the excitement of his senior season.

For Logar, it's his chance to add to an already stellar legacy.

"To win a state title in my senior year would be incredible," Logar said. "We've lost in the semifinals the last two years, so I'm just so excited right now to start my senior season."