Colby Cohen, a Villanova native and Radnor High School grad who made it to the NHL with the Colorado Avalanche and Boston Bruins, has been hired by NBC Sports Philadelphia as a Flyers analyst.

It's only a part-time gig for Cohen, who said he's slated to make about 15 appearances on upcoming editions of Flyers Pre- and Post-Game Live. He's scheduled to appear on NBC Sports Philadelphia's Flyers coverage Tuesday night alongside host Amy Fadool Kane and former Flyers defenseman Chris Therien, who was moved from game broadcasts into the studio earlier this month.

"I think they're testing a lot of new things out across the network, trying to mix things up," Cohen said. "Of course, I'm hoping to grow the role over time, like anyone would."

In addition to his new role on NBC Sports Philadelphia, Cohen will call several games this season for NBC Sports Radio and Westwood One, including the the stadium series match-up between the Flyers and the Pittsburgh Penguins at Lincoln Financial Field in February and the first two rounds of the NHL playoffs. He is also slated to call five college hockey games with John Buccigross this season on ESPN.

Though Cohen grew up on the Main Line and graduated from Radnor High School, he's more well known in Boston than in Philadelphia due to the three years he spent on Boston University's blue line. Cohen scored the game-winning goal in overtime that secured the Terriers' national championship in 2009.

Cohen said becoming a broadcaster was just a happy accident. After getting injured following his short stint with the Bruins, Cohen did some work with NESN as a college hockey analyst. Since hanging up his skates for good in 2015, Cohen has landed a solid slate of games — including the 2018 Olympics in Pyeongchang for NBC Radio.

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"Last year I called about 35 games," Cohen said. "I'm looking forward to doing some studio work this year. I like mixing it up."

As for the Flyers, who find themselves near the bottom of the Metropolitan Division to begin the season, Cohen thinks the slow start is less about bad defensive play and more about the team playing carelessly with the puck.

"I see a lot of turnovers happening around both blue lines … Usually those are the types of turnovers that really cost you in hockey," Cohen said. "I think it's sloppiness with the puck and careless plays across the board, not just the defense."